WMU: Video games may help some kids with attention issues; Kids of incarcerated men have increased health concerns

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WMU: Video games may help some kids with attention issues; Kids of incarcerated men have increased health concerns

The Weekly Mashup is a recurring segment on Hear Me Out, the Young Minds’ Blog, highlighting the most pertinent local and national news for children’s mental health advocates. If you haven’t already, sign up to be on our email list to get the Weekly MashUp delivered to your inbox automatically, every Thursday!

This Video Game Helped Some Kids Overcome Attention Problems
KQED – 4.6.17

A recent UCSF study, testing the effects of an iPad game on kids with sensory processing dysfunction (SPD), challenged the idea that extended exposure to video games and other technology gives kids “an ADHD-like inability to focus on tasks.” SPD is a condition estimated to impact 5% of all U.S. children, but it is not often studied. Symptoms vary and can include issues with auditory processing to something closer to autism spectrum disorder and ADHD. The game used, Project: EVO, is designed to target and improve problems with thinking, reacting, and completing tasks, and after nine months of use, parental feedback has suggested drastic improvement. Lead author, Joaquin Anguera, notes that “the fact that these parents reported persistent amounts of improvement for nine months — I think that’s really remarkable.”

When A Man Goes to Prison, His Children’s Health Suffers, Too, Study Finds
Stat – 4.6.17

Researchers of a recent study found that children of incarcerated men have increased physical, behavioral, and mental health concerns, the impact of which can linger for years. The study also concluded that families of incarcerated adults see higher infant mortality rates, financial insecurities that inhibit access to health care, and increased mental and physical health risks. This is concerning as the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Christopher Wildeman, a professor at Cornell University and lead author of the study, calls for increased spending on affordable housing, addiction services, and mental health programs, as well as policy reforms, to reduce the health concerns for inmates and their families.

Other Stories:

In Trump Era, L.A. Social Workers Seek Tighter Collaboration with Immigration Officers
The Chronicle of Social Change – 4.12.17

Palo Alto: Special Mental Health Program Launched For Teens
The Mercury News – 4.6.17

‘The Mask Kind Of Melted Off’: Founder of Black Girls Smile Opens Up About Her Depression
Stat – 4.6.17

It Takes a Suburb: A Town Struggles to Ease Student Stress
The New York Times – 4.5.17

Q&A: Stanford Psychiatrist on Preventing Teen Suicide
The Stanford Daily – 4.5.17

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By | 2017-04-13T17:36:53+00:00 April 13th, 2017|The Weekly Mash Up|0 Comments

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