Weekly MashUp: barriers to accessing MH services despite MH Parity Act and ACA; cultural differences in responding to MH concerns

//Weekly MashUp: barriers to accessing MH services despite MH Parity Act and ACA; cultural differences in responding to MH concerns

Weekly MashUp: barriers to accessing MH services despite MH Parity Act and ACA; cultural differences in responding to MH concerns

The Weekly MashUp is a recurring segment on Hear Me Out, the Young Minds’ Blog, highlighting the most pertinent local and national news for children’s mental health advocates. If you haven’t already, sign up to be on our email list to get the Weekly MashUp delivered to your inbox automatically, every Friday!

Single Mom’s Search For Therapist Foiled By Insurance Companies
California Healthline – 5.25.16

Over 43 million individuals living in the U.S suffer from depression, anxiety, and other mental health conditions, yet more than half of these individuals do not receive the support they need. The article tells the story of Natalie Dunnege, a single mother to a son with autism, and her struggle finding a therapist for herself. In an effort to address feelings of depression and the overwhelming nature of raising a child with needs on her own, Dunnege sought out professional services only to learn that her copay for a mental health visit would be double her copay for other doctors’ appointments. The 2008 Mental Health Parity Act and the Affordable Care Act were intended to resolve financial barriers to care by requiring health plans to provide benefits for mental health conditions on par with physical health conditions. However, challenges remain in enforcing laws created to make services more accessible.

Asking Mom: ‘Did You Know I Was Depressed In High School?’
NPR – 5.25.16

As a student in her third year of a clinical psychology PhD program, Rose reflects back on her struggles with depression in high school. She never felt comfortable discussing her depression with her parents due to the concern of disappointing them. She also worried that her mental health concerns would seem “frivolous” compared to the struggles that her mother and father, who emigrated to the United States from Pakistan, experienced. The article shares excerpts from Rose’s conversation with her mother around her experience with depression, and highlights the importance of non judgemental communications around mental health. Rose shares, “I’ve had years to come to terms with this knowledge about myself and I gave her, what, maybe an hour-long conversation and then expected her to, at the end of it, be totally understanding and calm and collected about it, which wasn’t fair on my part.”

Other Stories:

10 Books to Read During Mental Health Month
Penguin Teen – May 2016

California Winners Announced In Youth Film Contest To Prevent Suicide And Tackle Mental Health Stigma Among Peers
PR Newswire – 5.25.16

If Health-Care Providers Can’t Overcome the Stigma of Mental Illness, Who Will?
The Washington Post – 5.20.16

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**News stories shared  in the Weekly MashUp do not necessarily represent the views of Young Minds Advocacy.

By |2019-04-24T14:36:12-08:00May 27th, 2016|The Weekly Mash Up|0 Comments

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Posted by the Editors of Hear Me Out.